Trump’s election comes with foreseen backlash

Due to President-elect Donald Trump’s controversial statements about abortion, gun control, immigration and various other topics, the recent election of Trump as the nation’s next president has proven to be a topic of debate among CHS students. As a result of the election’s divisiveness, many found themselves shocked on election night.

Bloomberg LP reports that Clinton received 55 percent of the popular vote among youth voters (aged 18-29), whereas Trump received 33 percent. Both candidates were down from the millennial vote of the 2012 election, which had President Obama at 60 percent, compared to Mitt Romney’s 37 percent.

Thanks to a recent spike in reported hate crimes, many minority students report feeling unsafe within their schools. Eric Lichtblau of The New York Times reports a 6 percent increase in hate crimes nationwide, with many of these cases being the result of racial targeting.

“Trump wants to ban Muslims and build a wall to prevent Mexicans from entering,” junior Kaia Deagle says. “It goes against the foundation America was based on.”

Trump’s proposal to build a Southern border wall to prevent Mexican immigration has proved to be one of his most controversial plans, with many citing the idea as xenophobic.

“I don’t see how it’s fair to Mexicans to build a wall between us,” freshman Lara Agacanyan says.  “I think people should be able to come here easily whenever they want.”

Some students continue to believe that Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton was more qualified for the position, with many citing her political experience as her strongest point.

“I was definitely disappointed because Hillary Clinton was more qualified,” freshman Pascale Montgomery says. “The ways that Trump speaks about women are unacceptable in the 21st century.”

Other students pinpointed his lack of experience with foreign policy as a point of panic, with Trump already meeting with foreign leaders before his inauguration on Jan. 20.

“I think her policies are more thought out,” senior Sara Phillips says. “I think she has a lot more experience regarding foreign policy, which is one thing that worries me about Trump.”

President Barack Obama has met with Trump recently to discuss foreign policy. NBC notes that President Obama has stated that he hopes Trump will cut deals with Russia on the Ukraine and Syria. Obama has also stated that he hopes Trump is “willing to stand up to Russia when they are deviating from international norms.”

Some students have remained calm about Trump’s election, citing that it could be a positive change for American society.

“I was happy with the results of the election,” senior Dalan Laughlin says. “I think it will be a good change.”

Thousands of anti-Trump protesters have been filling the streets of numerous cities, with protesters holding signs and shouting popular campaign slogans like “not my president” and “love trumps hate.”

Protesters have received a negative response from both sides, with critics saying they should accept the results without fighting them. President Obama has said that he will not silence protestors, specifically pertaining to those who did not vote in the Nov. 8 election.

“I would not advise those who feel strongly about some of the issues that have been raised over the course of the campaign,” Obama said during a press conference. “I would not advise them to be silent.”

CHS junior Alexandra Roden noted that Americans should remain calm, and not allow the results to divide them.

“I feel that in the election, we just need to live with the results,” Roden says. “We can unite as a country instead of dividing and creating riots, and eventually make it through this together.”

Trump is scheduled to take office Jan. 20.

-Kylie Yeatman