Donald Trump: the result of American frustration

In June, almost everyone believed Donald Trump’s presidential campaign would go nowhere. Now, he is leading the voting for the Republican nomination.

How can a rude, ill-mannered businessman outsider have a chance at winning the Republican nomination?

Historically, Trump has had an overall successful business career. A graduate of the Wharton School of Finance at the University of Pennsylvania, Trump joined his father’s company, Elizabeth Trump & Son. In 1971 Donald Trump was given control of the company, which he later renamed the Trump Organization. Currently, his company is in the real estate, hotel and golf businesses.

On June 16, 2015, Trump declared he would run for president in the 2016 elections. On July 18, according to Real Clear Politics, Trump was at the top of the polls, passing Jeb Bush as the most popular presidential candidate for the Republican Party. He has mostly held that position till present day.

Super Tuesday confirmed Trump’s dominant position for the Republican presidential nominee. Trump, who won 7 of 11 primaries and caucuses, out-rivaled his primary opponents, Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz.

Upon Trump’s announcement to run for president, he made scathing, derogatory remarks about Mexicans and immigration, and these types of comments have frontlined his campaign.

On June 23, Trump commented that he would build a wall and make Mexico pay for it. On July 18, Trump set off a media outburst with comments disavowing John McCain’s reputation as a military hero. On Dec. 8, Trump proposed to ban all Muslims from entering the United States in wake of the San Bernardino shootings.

Never before had successful presidential candidates made such rude, racist and disrespectful statements. But during a time with a country sick of regular politicians and political correctness, Trump has become successful. Trump has been extremely effective with his simple rhetoric and campaign slogans, and his self-funded campaign adds extra appeal.

America’s frustration has illuminated a real estate mogul from a crowd of governors, senators and representatives (and a neurosurgeon).

However, resistance to Trump still runs deep in the Republican Party and some groups of Americans due to his business failures, his past liberal positions, his lack of description in his policies, his rude rhetoric and their lack of faith that Trump can win in a general election. Most recently, the Trump University fraud cases that continue to exist, even after six years of the school’s closing, are creating nervousness in the Republican Party and reluctance in the undecided voters.

Yet because Trump has been dominant thus far, it is certain that he will be the Republican nominee, despite resistance from his own party.

-Ryan Lin