Opinion: Can the senior class finally unite?

A funny thing dawned on me not long ago. The post-desert trip haze of friendship—and body odor—had faded. No longer were kids tackling each other in warm bear hugs in the hallway. Things were back to normal. That’s when it hit me: contrary to the popular belief, contrary to what I’d been told since I was a starry-eyed freshman, the senior class doesn’t simply come together in the face of permanent separation.

It’s not for lack of trying though. The Class of 2013 Facebook group, which indirectly proves direct democracy is about as effective as a toilet-paper raincoat, is full of ideas for class unity, yet every talent show, beach bonfire and sweatshirt design seems only to cause more bickering than bonding.

Some might argue, assuming our bus makes it past Soledad, we still have the GradNite trip to bring us closer. However, thinking back to the signups for the trip’s buses, seniors flocked, jostled and traded to avoid the unimaginable horror of having to take a bus ride with someone they hadn’t known since the Pack-‘N-Play days.

Despite the ample opportunities provided, we remain stuck in a social traffic jam, crammed in close proximity, able to see new people through hazy windows, yet still walled off from each other in a sea of cliquish Prii.

To be sure, anyone can point out a problem—Fox News, we’re looking at you—but it’s far harder to understand the root of the issue, and it’s still harder to find a solution.

What’s to blame for the disunity? Perhaps being able to jet off campus during lunch gives us less reason to branch out beyond who can fit in our backseats or trunks (allegedly). Then again, being able to occasionally leave campus also offers a nice diversion. Besides, our class still interacts the rest of the day.

So in those 420 other minutes of the day, what keeps us from crossing A.P.reppy/Parking Lot Stoner/Cafeteria Crew lines?

Ignorance.

By the time of this issue’s publication, you’ll be able to count the days of school left on your left foot. Perhaps our division is due to the fact that people don’t realize they’re mere weeks away from never seeing half the people they know ever again. Optimistic, I know. Indeed, graduation is right around the corner. Actually, no, graduation has rounded the corner, and now it’s just awkwardly trying to wave to you, and you don’t notice.

So, in conclusion, unbury your heads, social ostriches! Because once you’re in college, your close friends will stay close, but those you barely know might as well barely exist.

-JOSH MARCUS